Ontario Railway Station Museums


INDEX
Bancroft
Barry's Bay
Brighton
Caledonia
Collingwood
Craigleith
Haliburton
Huntsville & Lake of Bays
Kinmount
Komoka
Owen Sound
Palmerston 
Smiths Falls (Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario)
Uxbridge
Wiarton
Stations as part of larger or other museums, or tourist railways

INTRODUCTORY
When the vast majority of Ontario communities lost their railway stations during the general abandonment of passenger service in the mid-20th century, most were demolished, many became private homes or sheds, some became restaurants or B&Bs, a few were retained by the railways in maintenance or operating capacities; many were put to civic use such as for a community or seniors' centre, library, art gallery, museum, tourist information office, chamber of commerce; or were/are in a succession or combination of such uses that may also have changed over time. Some, while serving in another capacity, have gone out of their way to retain some recognition of the building's former purpose, although they may not be, or may not describe themselves, as a "museum". 
Others have become part of a tourist railway operation or are part of county or community museums with a wider focus than railway history, so are not "railway museums" as such, but have been preserved, and usually demonstrate some railway history, to illustrate the contribution the railway made to the community and the function of the station as a social hub in an age when the station was also a primary communication link with the outside world.
This record is anecdotal, often with a "snapshot" in a given point of time. It is not intended to be a catalog of surviving stations and the use to which they have been put, nor is it intended to be a directory of places to be visited with opening days and hours, but where there are additional sources of such information, this information will link it. Nor does this webpage set out to list and describe railway museums that are not housed in a station, such as at Toronto, Ottawa, NiagaraFort Erie or St. Thomas. Additional contributions, corrections, suggestions and updates are certainly welcomed.
BANCROFT
http://www.bancroftdistrict.com/
http://www.davidkjoyceminerals.com/pagefiles/articles_bancroft.asp
This commodious station has been jacked up on its original location to provide for a new and lasting foundation. The station consists of a former large general  waiting room (now the local chamber of commerce office), the former agent's office (now the reception area), and a substantial baggage/freight room that now houses the Bancroft Gem & Mineral Club Mineral Museum. Mining was the original major commercial reason for the railway to come to Bancroft and area in the first place. The station's original major design features have been faithfully retained, including the tin ceiling of the waiting room - a feature commonly reminiscent of old-time department and village grocery stores, but somewhat rare in stations. 
1 img 8041 station and mine trolley
This most impressive mineral museum is in the former freight room. It is exceedingly well presented and clearly explained, and some of the exhibits are simply breathtaking in their beauty. Well worth the modest price of admission.

This most impressive mineral museum is in the former freight room. It is exceedingly well presented and clearly explained, and some of the exhibits are simply breathtaking in their beauty. Well worth the modest price of admission.

The chamber of commerce reception and reading room in the former agent's office. The telegrapher's bay is to the right, the door behind the visitor leads to the former waiting room, now the c of c office. The former ticket window is beside the door.

The chamber of commerce reception and reading room in the former agent's office. The telegrapher's bay is to the right, the door behind the visitor leads to the former waiting room, now the c of c office. The former ticket window is beside the door.

The light streams in from the north window of the former waiting room and reflects off the exquisite tin ceiling that has been so well preserved in the station's renovation.

The light streams in from the north window of the former waiting room and reflects off the exquisite tin ceiling that has been so well preserved in the station's renovation.

BARRY'S BAY
http://www.renfrewcountymuseums.org/museum/barry%E2%80%99s-bay-railway-station-museum
A small community memento of its railway past. The station is now a welcome centre and a railway museum. Not far away is the surviving water tank, and there is also a caboose on a nearby plinth that is being worked on.
192 9210 img
192 9213 img
BRIGHTON (Memory Junction Railway Museum)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_Junction_Railway_Museum
http://www.brighton.ca/museumsandheritagec146.php
The links above will guide you to a wealth of background information to this interesting combination "railway-local history-agriculture" museum. It is situated in and around one of the original remaining 1857-plus Grand Trunk Railway mainline stations through southern Ontario, its additional distinction being that while the others were built with limestone, this one was built with brick. I visited the Brighton station when it was still in service in the early 1960s, and did not see it again until a few years ago, when I came to visit what is now the museum in the station (still in its original location but fenced off from the continuous rail traffic) and the grounds. The railway history component is by far the largest of the three, and the outside equipment artefacts are an important component of the visit experience. When I visited, there was an entertaining and knowledgeable guided tour, but if you don't know what it is you're looking at, you definitely need to ask questions.
Note: This museum is privately-owned. Its owner, Mr. Ralph Bangay, is getting on in years and will not be able to carry on much longer. He would like to sell the property and inventory. Anyone interested in discussing this with him is invited to give him a call at 613.475.0379. 
Clearly the peeling paint, when this picture was taken in 2009, is giving this venerable old building a somewhat tatty look. The view is towards Montreal, and the trackside is in behind.

Clearly the peeling paint, when this picture was taken in 2009, is giving this venerable old building a somewhat tatty look. The view is towards Montreal, and the trackside is in behind.

A veritable cornucopia of railway memorabilia in the general waiting room.

A veritable cornucopia of railway memorabilia in the general waiting room.

Another view of the general waiting room near the ticket window. Again, "storage on display" perhaps, but many railway collectibles of a time gone by.

Another view of the general waiting room near the ticket window. Again, "storage on display" perhaps, but many railway collectibles of a time gone by.

Arguably the principal outdoor display: CNR Consolidation-type No. 2534 formerly on display at Belleville, Ont., with a Fowler-type outside-braced wooden boxcar and a wooden CNR caboose, assembled as a display train.

Arguably the principal outdoor display: CNR Consolidation-type No. 2534 formerly on display at Belleville, Ont., with a Fowler-type outside-braced wooden boxcar and a wooden CNR caboose, assembled as a display train.

A centre-cupola CPR steel caboose and ...

A centre-cupola CPR steel caboose and ...

... a latter-day CNR speeder (track inspection vehicle, in sharp contrast to a 1898 velocipede that is also on display in the baggage room shed adjoining the station.

... a latter-day CNR speeder (track inspection vehicle, in sharp contrast to a 1898 velocipede that is also on display in the baggage room shed adjoining the station.

CALEDONIA
http://www.haldimandcounty.on.ca/Visitors.aspx?id=1098

Now best known as the home of the Caledonia & District Chamber of Commerce, where years ago I received some most helpful information when I was working on my book Hamilton's Other Railway (oh, shameless plug), it has remained mindful of its railway history, and has preserved the waiting room with its original ambience, but with the added touch (just like the Owen Sound museum) of having a G scale train chug along way near the ceiling. To my chagrin, when I took the following pictures, I had to do so through the window because the station was closed that day, and I wasn't exactly in a position to come back..

A real Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) "painted lady" in her retirement years. The platform track has been gone for many a year, but the shortline railway that serves Nanticoke switches direction here every day, and before departure, the train crew can be found having their cup of java in Tim's across the road.

A real Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) "painted lady" in her retirement years. The platform track has been gone for many a year, but the shortline railway that serves Nanticoke switches direction here every day, and before departure, the train crew can be found having their cup of java in Tim's across the road.

A delightful relic near the trackside waiting room door, where folks could deposit their mail for pick-up by the daily railway post office (RPO) car in the days gone by.

A delightful relic near the trackside waiting room door, where folks could deposit their mail for pick-up by the daily railway post office (RPO) car in the days gone by.

Peering in through the side window of the telegrapher's bay at all the delightful railway memorabilia on the operator's desk ...

Peering in through the side window of the telegrapher's bay at all the delightful railway memorabilia on the operator's desk ...

... and the wainscotted waiting room with a steamer trunk and its ubiquitous pot-bellied stove - all stations had them - it was the only way to keep warm ...

... and the wainscotted waiting room with a steamer trunk and its ubiquitous pot-bellied stove - all stations had them - it was the only way to keep warm ...

... no waiting room benches, but there in the top left corner is that G scale train. Too bad about the glare but that's the best I could do from the outside looking in.

... no waiting room benches, but there in the top left corner is that G scale train. Too bad about the glare but that's the best I could do from the outside looking in.

COLLINGWOOD
http://www.collingwood.ca/museum
The Collingwood Museum building is a remarkable story of the town's remembrance of its railway heritage, in that the museum building itself is an excellent replica of the original Northern Railway of Canada Frederic Cumberland station design, built in 1873 to replace Collingwood's first Ontario, Simcoe & Huron Union Rail Road station. In 1932 the second station suffered a grievous fire, so that only the centre portion survived and continued to serve as Collingwood's station until the end of passenger service. When the building was being considered for a post-railway existence, it was discovered that the ravages of the 1932 fire made this unwise, with the result that the original remnant of the Cumberland building was then demolished (1997), to be resurrected with the creation of a magnificent replica that stands in the same location as the original building, officially opened on September 19, 1998. From a railway history perspective, the museum does acknowledge, and displays artefacts of, the railway era; but its stronger focus is on Collingwood's marine history. Its real acknowledgment of Collingwood's railway history is the building itself, and the display of boxcars adjacent to the museum's "railside". 
Collingwood's first station at the north edge of St. Paul Street. Built by the Ontario, Simcoe & Huron Union Rail Road for the arrival of the railway in 1855. Archives of Ontario Collection.

Collingwood's first station at the north edge of St. Paul Street. Built by the Ontario, Simcoe & Huron Union Rail Road for the arrival of the railway in 1855. Archives of Ontario Collection.

A view from the station grounds looking south to Barrie sometime in the pioneering years of the Northern Railway of Canada. National Archives of Canada Collection PA138976.

A view from the station grounds looking south to Barrie sometime in the pioneering years of the Northern Railway of Canada. National Archives of Canada Collection PA138976.

Northern Railway of Canada plan for the 1873 "Cumberland" station. National Archives of Canada Collection.

Northern Railway of Canada plan for the 1873 "Cumberland" station. National Archives of Canada Collection.

Collingwood station looking north to the grain elevator in the distance, with a train arriving from either Beeton or Meaford, around 1910.

Collingwood station looking north to the grain elevator in the distance, with a train arriving from either Beeton or Meaford, around 1910.

The station in the 1950s, well after the 1932 fire that stripped away the tower and the wing porticos.

The station in the 1950s, well after the 1932 fire that stripped away the tower and the wing porticos.

The near-abandoned station area looking north in 1979.

The near-abandoned station area looking north in 1979.

The magnificent replica station in 2009, the former station area now parkland.

The magnificent replica station in 2009, the former station area now parkland.

A salute to Collingwood's railway past with two steel boxcars at the easterly edge of the parkland opposite the station.

A salute to Collingwood's railway past with two steel boxcars at the easterly edge of the parkland opposite the station.

Adjacent to the two steel boxcars is an earlier outside-braced Fowler-type wooden boxcar serving as the ticket office for "Theatre Collingwood".  A creative encapsulation of railway history at a venue of culture and remembrance.

Adjacent to the two steel boxcars is an earlier outside-braced Fowler-type wooden boxcar serving as the ticket office for "Theatre Collingwood". A creative encapsulation of railway history at a venue of culture and remembrance.

CRAIGLEITH
http://www.thebluemountains.ca/Craigleith-Heritage-Depot.cfm
http://www.mycollingwood.ca/Craigleith_Depot.asp
The history of this charming survivor of the railway age is well-penned as per the links above.
I had the privilege of visiting it several years ago, and was struck by the graceful blending of its railway history in the cosy space of a small station, with its role today as a heritage and interpretation centre.
A portrait taken in its working days on July 18, 1958. Photo Paterson-George Collection.

A portrait taken in its working days on July 18, 1958. Photo Paterson-George Collection.

... and in its current role just over a half century later.

... and in its current role just over a half century later.

Creative ...

Creative ...

... thoughtful ...

... thoughtful ...

... décor and displays.

... décor and displays.

HALIBURTON (Rails End Gallery)
http://www.railsendgallery.com/
When lumbering started to fade in the 1950s, Haliburton had the remarkable foresight to reinvent itself (taking advantage of the natural asset of the beauty of the Highlands) into a centre for the arts, whose renown has spread far and away. In 1980, the station building, now owned by Haliburton County, became the very visible hub of that ongoing transformation right in Haliburton itself, as the home of the Rails End Gallery. While it is an art galley and not a museum, it deserves inclusion here because of its respect for the station's role in the area's former railway-based life and economy. A Grand Trunk Railway rebuild in 1901 of the original predecessor station, it was a of a standard tri-partite general waiting room, agent's office and baggage/freight room design. Out on the street-side there is also a CNR steel boxcar; and at the entrance to a beautiful waterfront park that was once the railway lands and now hosts many civic outdoor functions including an annual art festival sponsored by the host gallery, there is a CNR caboose that serves as the town's information office. A little bit further down the rail trail near where it crosses County Road 21, CNR Consolidation-type 2-8-0 No. 2616 that used to be a regular engine on the Haliburton run, is now well-preserved on a plinth.
The station, shortly after being jacked up on its new foundation. It caused controversy at the time, but there surely has to be agreement that this has the promise of an enduring existence of a priceless civic amenity.

The station, shortly after being jacked up on its new foundation. It caused controversy at the time, but there surely has to be agreement that this has the promise of an enduring existence of a priceless civic amenity.

The waiting room now functions as "the lower gallery" for permanent exhibits and guest artists' offerings. Note the original waiting room bench and the wainscotting.

The waiting room now functions as "the lower gallery" for permanent exhibits and guest artists' offerings. Note the original waiting room bench and the wainscotting.

The former agent's office has been divided up into an entrance lobby, gift shop (seen here) and in behind those spaces, into the administrative office and storage room - rather symbolic of the multi-function tasks the agent had to perform in the railway hey-day!

The former agent's office has been divided up into an entrance lobby, gift shop (seen here) and in behind those spaces, into the administrative office and storage room - rather symbolic of the multi-function tasks the agent had to perform in the railway hey-day!

This former CNR advertisement from the station in its railway days now hangs in the closet off the waiting room.

This former CNR advertisement from the station in its railway days now hangs in the closet off the waiting room.

Exhibitions may come and exhibitions may go, but this large weigh scale remains in the hosting baggage/freight room as a mute reminder of this portion of the station's former function. Andrea Percy photo.

Exhibitions may come and exhibitions may go, but this large weigh scale remains in the hosting baggage/freight room as a mute reminder of this portion of the station's former function. Andrea Percy photo.

This impressive timepiece was imported all the way from Quebec by the Gallery as a replacement for the former station clock, a commemoration that time was the governing master of the railway world.

This impressive timepiece was imported all the way from Quebec by the Gallery as a replacement for the former station clock, a commemoration that time was the governing master of the railway world.

A contemporary view of the station from the direction of the tourist information caboose, that speaks of a little more railway history and the attraction of the adjoining beautiful parkland. Andrea Percy photo

A contemporary view of the station from the direction of the tourist information caboose, that speaks of a little more railway history and the attraction of the adjoining beautiful parkland. Andrea Percy photo

HUNTSVILLE & LAKE OF BAYS (Muskoka Heritage Place)
http://www.muskokaheritageplace.org/en/
This museum is a remarkable memento to the bygone Portage Flyer, consisting not only of a working re-enactment of that short portage railway, with much original equipment, but also having in the replica station a good collection of railway memorabilia. Two old Porter locomotives that once did duty on the original railway still provide the motive power, assisted by a 25 ton diesel switcher on their "off-duty" days. The railway is on the 3 ft 6 in gauge. A most worthwhile outing and a delightful revival experience of that unique and quirky little railway. Not to be missed.
This picture of the Huntsville-end station, taken in 2007 before the Huntsville G8 summit and the consequently-necessitated relocation to the east side of the tracks, is already an historical item. At the platform are the refurbished open cars that once operated on the Portage Flyer.

This picture of the Huntsville-end station, taken in 2007 before the Huntsville G8 summit and the consequently-necessitated relocation to the east side of the tracks, is already an historical item. At the platform are the refurbished open cars that once operated on the Portage Flyer.

The station platform when relocated to the west side, looking south, with the three-stall engine shed in the distance. Jim Swanson photo.

The station platform when relocated to the west side, looking south, with the three-stall engine shed in the distance. Jim Swanson photo.

The station interior in the pre-move days.

The station interior in the pre-move days.

A collection of whacky Rowland Emett-style way maintenance equipment. A primitive weeder at the far left, then two ballast tip wagons, one tipping in-line with the ties and the other in-line with the rails; and in the foreground a beaten-up old flatcar with the obligatory spare rails.

A collection of whacky Rowland Emett-style way maintenance equipment. A primitive weeder at the far left, then two ballast tip wagons, one tipping in-line with the ties and the other in-line with the rails; and in the foreground a beaten-up old flatcar with the obligatory spare rails.

The telegrapher's bay in the post-move station, with the usual collection of operator's tools of his occupation, telegraph, telephone and a few train order hoops of varying lengths and designs. Jim Swanson photo.

The telegrapher's bay in the post-move station, with the usual collection of operator's tools of his occupation, telegraph, telephone and a few train order hoops of varying lengths and designs. Jim Swanson photo.

KINMOUNT
For more detail on the historical model railway, go to Prototype Modelling.

Like Haliburton's station, Kinmount (also dating from 1901) is a Grand Trunk Railway re-build on the site of the original station. As with most former country stations, the building consists of a waiting room (which now serves as a tourist information office); the agent's office (that has been restored to its former function as the primary museum component), and the baggage room, that has housed the historical model railway since 1996. Featured are a variety of artifacts from the railway era and various interpretative pictures and maps.

Open hours (from the Victoria Day weekend to the Labour Day weekend) are:
Fridays 10 to 6.
Saturdays 9 to 5 (volunteers come in at around 10 am to operate the model railway and the telegraph).
Sundays 10 to 5.

The station has been raised from its original foundation, but remains at its trackside location. The railway-era biffies have since been replaced by a modern washroom to handle all the ATV traffic!

The station has been raised from its original foundation, but remains at its trackside location. The railway-era biffies have since been replaced by a modern washroom to handle all the ATV traffic!

The right-hand edge of the ticket window is just visible on the inside wall of the panelled waiting room.

The right-hand edge of the ticket window is just visible on the inside wall of the panelled waiting room.

The volunteer-on-duty checks his notes on the old stove, while a visitor browses among the various informational leaflets. The view is of the former agent's office, looking towards the back.

The volunteer-on-duty checks his notes on the old stove, while a visitor browses among the various informational leaflets. The view is of the former agent's office, looking towards the back.

The former ugly fluorescent lighting has been removed  in favour of contemporary suspended lamps, allowing the craftsman ceiling panelling of the agent's office to be displayed to full effect.

The former ugly fluorescent lighting has been removed in favour of contemporary suspended lamps, allowing the craftsman ceiling panelling of the agent's office to be displayed to full effect.

View of the waiting-room side of the agent's office, with the traditional Grand Trunk Railway ticket window design.

View of the waiting-room side of the agent's office, with the traditional Grand Trunk Railway ticket window design.

A scissors-arm telephone and the operator's key, relay and sounder is on display at his desk. Note the telegraph insulators that have been affixed to the operator's chair, so that it slides around easily.

A scissors-arm telephone and the operator's key, relay and sounder is on display at his desk. Note the telegraph insulators that have been affixed to the operator's chair, so that it slides around easily.

Various pictures of pioneer Kinmount adorn  the wall above the actual CNR-era (and perhaps prior to that?) station agent's desk.

Various pictures of pioneer Kinmount adorn the wall above the actual CNR-era (and perhaps prior to that?) station agent's desk.

A look into the former baggage room, the home of the historical Kinmount model railway.

A look into the former baggage room, the home of the historical Kinmount model railway.

Hopkins & Marks was the foremost retail emporium in Kinmount from 1890 to the disastrous village fire in 1942. This crate lid dates from the GTR days.

Hopkins & Marks was the foremost retail emporium in Kinmount from 1890 to the disastrous village fire in 1942. This crate lid dates from the GTR days.

The ubiquitous luggage cart, the porter's friend for moving around individual passengers' luggage, which in the heyday of the Railway Age could be quite commodious with heavy steamer trunks and not so weighty, but awkwardly bulky hat boxes and such-like.

The ubiquitous luggage cart, the porter's friend for moving around individual passengers' luggage, which in the heyday of the Railway Age could be quite commodious with heavy steamer trunks and not so weighty, but awkwardly bulky hat boxes and such-like.

Speeder or track inspection vehicle.

Speeder or track inspection vehicle.

A baggage cart, a most necessary adjunct of all railway stations, large and small, for the loading/unloading of baggage and express. To its left is a formerly iconic early CNR-era railway crossing sign.

A baggage cart, a most necessary adjunct of all railway stations, large and small, for the loading/unloading of baggage and express. To its left is a formerly iconic early CNR-era railway crossing sign.

The construction of the Victoria Railway was assisted by an intended immigrant settlement scheme. The only "takers" were some 300 Icelanders who were good workers, but spent a miserable 1874 winter in nearby shanties just south of Kinmount with dysentery and a consequent number of deaths, and then moved on to Gimli, Manitoba. Their contribution is commemorated by this cairn just outside the station. (The building in the background is a replica GTR-style building to house parks equipment.)

The construction of the Victoria Railway was assisted by an intended immigrant settlement scheme. The only "takers" were some 300 Icelanders who were good workers, but spent a miserable 1874 winter in nearby shanties just south of Kinmount with dysentery and a consequent number of deaths, and then moved on to Gimli, Manitoba. Their contribution is commemorated by this cairn just outside the station. (The building in the background is a replica GTR-style building to house parks equipment.)

KOMOKA
http://www.komokarailmuseum.ca/
There was a time when I used to drive down the 401 past London way all the time, and I kept saying - "gotta make a detour and drop in on the Komoka Railway Museum". Well, to my regret, I never did, but I have a friend who did stop by, and took some pictures. It sure looks like a dandy museum with some interesting preserved equipment, such as a 1913 Shay logging locomotive, a pre-WWII 70 ft CNR baggage car, a GT&W caboose, and a Canadian National Railways 1979 GMC-Grumman Hi-Railer. Among the artifacts there is the usual wealth of railroadiana, but including an impressive collection of lanterns and a velocipede (an old-time track inspection vehicle before the better-remembered jiggers or latter-day speeders [there are examples of those there too]). And there is a track at the back of the museum where on most Saturdays in the summer "live steam" coal-powered locomotives are operated. See http://www.komokarailmuseum.ca/index.php/live-steam-trains/

Station and Museum site. Photo Komoka Museum website

Station and Museum site. Photo Komoka Museum website

The 1913 Shay-type logging locomotive. For details check the museum website. Don McClellan photo.

The 1913 Shay-type logging locomotive. For details check the museum website. Don McClellan photo.

The restored velocipede (early track inspection vehicle, pump action) suspended from the ceiling of the museum barn. Don McClellan photo.

The restored velocipede (early track inspection vehicle, pump action) suspended from the ceiling of the museum barn. Don McClellan photo.

The restored Canadian National Railways 1979 GMC-Grumman Hi-Railer. Don McClellan photo.

The restored Canadian National Railways 1979 GMC-Grumman Hi-Railer. Don McClellan photo.

Grand Trunk Western caboose. Museum website photo.

Grand Trunk Western caboose. Museum website photo.

Fish-eye view of the museum interior. Museum website photo.

Fish-eye view of the museum interior. Museum website photo.

Speeder and trailer. Museum website photo.

Speeder and trailer. Museum website photo.

OWEN SOUND (CNR)

Owen Sound is one of those fortunate towns to have been able to hang onto its railway stations. The former CNR station has been the Owen Sound  Marine & Rail Museum (and combo tourist information office) for a number of years, and has been a natural steady attraction for visitors at its waterside location on the west side of the harbour, with its attractively redesigned station area. Imagine then a proposal to take it all apart and despatch the artefacts to the Grey Roots Archive & Museum in Owen Sound's hinterland. No disrespect, but it would be difficult to imagine the same appeal and tourist attraction buzz compared to where it is. After all, a marine and rail museum would seem to be a lot more relevant close to where the action was - sort of a "no-brainer"? So to make an apparently long story short, some far-sighted citizens cobbled together the Community Waterfront Heritage Centre, and thankfully the museum lives on - so do drop in, enjoy and drop some bucks into the donation box - in the railway museum domain that's always a tangible show of support, but it's especially deserved here. The museum has an interesting worthwhile combination of marine and railway history that is well worth a visit. 

This fine building, dating from 1932, is strategically located in Owen Sound's former manufacturing area near the water front, with some well-manicured parkland between it and the harbour.

This fine building, dating from 1932, is strategically located in Owen Sound's former manufacturing area near the water front, with some well-manicured parkland between it and the harbour.

At the museum entrance, looking towards the former agent's office.

At the museum entrance, looking towards the former agent's office.

A closer-up view of some of the many railway artefacts, with a G scale freight train doing a generous circuit up above.

A closer-up view of some of the many railway artefacts, with a G scale freight train doing a generous circuit up above.

Railway artefacts in the walk-through to the marine part of the museum in the former freight room.

Railway artefacts in the walk-through to the marine part of the museum in the former freight room.

A steamer trunk from days gone by, and telegraphy equipment and related signs under glass in the adjoining display case.

A steamer trunk from days gone by, and telegraphy equipment and related signs under glass in the adjoining display case.

This well-restored caboose is part of the museum display, and one of the volunteers will be glad to open it up for any visitor who would like to have a look around inside.

This well-restored caboose is part of the museum display, and one of the volunteers will be glad to open it up for any visitor who would like to have a look around inside.

The well-appointed caboose interior. (At the time this image was taken, there was a station stove in temporary storage in front of the regular caboose stove.)

The well-appointed caboose interior. (At the time this image was taken, there was a station stove in temporary storage in front of the regular caboose stove.)

Recently added is CNR parlor car #4884, now in the process of refurbishment.  Its future role as part of the museum has not yet been decided. It is spotted ahead of the caboose, and just north of the station museum.

Recently added is CNR parlor car #4884, now in the process of refurbishment. Its future role as part of the museum has not yet been decided. It is spotted ahead of the caboose, and just north of the station museum.

The museum displays a wealth of local marine history, and this small tugboat "Ancaster" (built in Owen Sound) has a special little claim to fame in that it appeared on our last one dollar bill, now too part of history.

The museum displays a wealth of local marine history, and this small tugboat "Ancaster" (built in Owen Sound) has a special little claim to fame in that it appeared on our last one dollar bill, now too part of history.

The "Ancaster" is the smaller boat to the right.

The "Ancaster" is the smaller boat to the right.

PALMERSTON
http://www.palmerstonrailwaymuseum.com/
Among all the former CNR Ontario division points, Palmerston can point proudly to an impressive commemoration of its railway past as a very busy junction point, by dint of much volunteer and civic support. The beautifully restored station and the preserved station area including that of the storied walkway across the many former diverging railway tracks beg for a top spot among railway history outings.
After the completed restoration 1999.

After the completed restoration 1999.

All boarded up in 1993, with an uncertain future.

All boarded up in 1993, with an uncertain future.

A few years later, a sight to stop you short for sure, if you don't know what's going on.

A few years later, a sight to stop you short for sure, if you don't know what's going on.

With the restoration complete in 1999, looking north to Durham, Harriston and beyond to Southampton, Wiarton and Owen Sound.

With the restoration complete in 1999, looking north to Durham, Harriston and beyond to Southampton, Wiarton and Owen Sound.

Looking south towards the station in the same year, celebrating two of Palmerston's signature features - the long walkway across the once busy traffic, and the tracks that are about to become the home of the handcar races.

Looking south towards the station in the same year, celebrating two of Palmerston's signature features - the long walkway across the once busy traffic, and the tracks that are about to become the home of the handcar races.

Generations of schoolchildren took this overpass to school - being enveloped in steam and smoke and the unforgettable rumble of trains - how many life-long railway enthusiasts has this bridge promoted?

Generations of schoolchildren took this overpass to school - being enveloped in steam and smoke and the unforgettable rumble of trains - how many life-long railway enthusiasts has this bridge promoted?

Off to one side, there is another treasure - a Mogul-type 2-6-0 that the CNR inherited from the Grand Trunk Railway. They were a tough class of engines that handled all kinds of mixed traffic all over Ontario's branchlines.

Off to one side, there is another treasure - a Mogul-type 2-6-0 that the CNR inherited from the Grand Trunk Railway. They were a tough class of engines that handled all kinds of mixed traffic all over Ontario's branchlines.

SMITHS FALLS
(Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario)
http://rmeo.org/
This museum boasts a graciously-restored station building and interior, with a variety of artefacts; and an extensive equipment collection.
Well worth a visit.
Smiths falls cnor as museum
Smiths falls0003
CNR  #15095 Dental Car

CNR #15095 Dental Car

Various passenger equipment and inspection car

Various passenger equipment and inspection car

CPR S-3 switcher #6591

CPR S-3 switcher #6591

ex CNoR CNR Class G16a  #1112 and CPR caboose #436757

ex CNoR CNR Class G16a #1112 and CPR caboose #436757

railway cottages

railway cottages

Bilingual grade crossing sign

Bilingual grade crossing sign

Nolan's Corners CNR flag stop

Nolan's Corners CNR flag stop

UXBRIDGE
The York-Durham Heritage Railway.
This for-the-Grand-Trunk-Railway-rare witch's hat station that replaced the original pioneer Toronto & Nipissing Railway station in 1904, is at the northern terminus of the YDHR tourist railway. The former ladies' waiting room serves as a meeting room for the local Business Improvement Area (BIA), and the general waiting and baggage rooms serve as office, waiting room and museum for the YDHR. 
The station, looking north-east, with a consist of traditional passenger cars awaiting their next outing.

The station, looking north-east, with a consist of traditional passenger cars awaiting their next outing.

Visitors to the museum can usually get a peek at this magnificent ladies' waiting room ceiling. The chandelier is definitely post-GTR, but the craftsmanship and finish are worth an "awesome!"

Visitors to the museum can usually get a peek at this magnificent ladies' waiting room ceiling. The chandelier is definitely post-GTR, but the craftsmanship and finish are worth an "awesome!"

The north-side of the former general waiting room, with the entrance through to the museum (in the baggage room). The iconic London Transport Board sign of the Uxbridge station on the "tube" network is a tip-of-the-hat to Uxbridge's namesake "over 'ome".

The north-side of the former general waiting room, with the entrance through to the museum (in the baggage room). The iconic London Transport Board sign of the Uxbridge station on the "tube" network is a tip-of-the-hat to Uxbridge's namesake "over 'ome".

South side of the general waiting room, with the agent's office behind the ticket window and between the two waiting rooms (with another ticket window for the ladies' waiting room).

South side of the general waiting room, with the agent's office behind the ticket window and between the two waiting rooms (with another ticket window for the ladies' waiting room).

The museum is packed with all kinds of railway memorabilia and artefacts ranging from timetables, pictures to a baggage cart stashed away in a corner. All a little jammed-in, some of it in need of interpretation and obviously still a work-in-progress, but an absolute treasure trove of railway-times-gone-by.

The museum is packed with all kinds of railway memorabilia and artefacts ranging from timetables, pictures to a baggage cart stashed away in a corner. All a little jammed-in, some of it in need of interpretation and obviously still a work-in-progress, but an absolute treasure trove of railway-times-gone-by.

WIARTON
http://postcard.wiarton.ca/wiarton11.html
http://www.wiartonecho.com/2009/05/12/train-station-designated-3
The above links provide most interesting background information, with particular reference to the magnificent ceilings. The Wiarton station does not advertise itself as a museum, but as a tourist information centre and a heritage-designated building. Built by the Grand Trunk Railway in 1904 to replace an earlier station, it was formerly located at George and Claude Streets, and moved to nearby Bluewater Park in its retirement. A pavilion has been added there in place of the original adjoining freight shed. The building design is unique with its two distinctive turrets, and unusually for a smaller station, consisted of a ladies' waiting room, a general waiting room and the agent's office. It is the centrepiece of the park, and a visit is well worthwhile for its architectural aesthetics, even if one is not a railway history buff.
This view is of the "forecourt" or "street" side of the station, as opposed to the "platform" side. The former ladies' waiting room was under the curved portion of the roof.

This view is of the "forecourt" or "street" side of the station, as opposed to the "platform" side. The former ladies' waiting room was under the curved portion of the roof.

A beautifully-preserved "musical chairs" bench in the ladies' waiting room.

A beautifully-preserved "musical chairs" bench in the ladies' waiting room.

Two "back-to-back" general waiting room benches. (Their design is pretty much interchangeable with that of early church pews [and about as comfortable!])

Two "back-to-back" general waiting room benches. (Their design is pretty much interchangeable with that of early church pews [and about as comfortable!])

An exquisitely-ornate station room stove.

An exquisitely-ornate station room stove.

The beautifully-crafted ceiling of the general waiting room ...

The beautifully-crafted ceiling of the general waiting room ...

... and facing towards the bay window end of the agent's office ...

... and facing towards the bay window end of the agent's office ...

... and in the ladies' waiting room.

... and in the ladies' waiting room.

Stations as part of larger or other museums, or tourist railways
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